Tag Archives: grey seal

It’s a fish – day two

Day two of the seasearch course started relatively early (for a Sunday). We met at Towan headland in Newquay by the old lifeboat station, and the car park started to fill with divers in various states of getting ready. Most of the course participants were diving, but three of us (including me) were snorkelling. We accessed the water down a natural rock ramp, which was much less steep than the old lifeboat slipway, and entered the water at 9.30, around two hours after local high water. As I was only wearing a summer 3mm wetsuit the cold shock was a little bracing and left me hyperventilating for a good twenty seconds, as well as giving me the start of a wonderful ‘ice-cream’ headache. Visibility was around 5m as we began to snorkel. We remained on the surface so as not to interfere with the divers surveying below us, which restricted us to observing what was in the water column or on the shallower rocks, and consequently saw mostly sand eels and spider crabs. We were joined by a female grey seal who kept us company for a while before disappearing to visit the divers. As we swam back to the exit point I could see the silhouette of the seal below me, just at the limit of visibility.

Grey Seal
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus). CC BY-SA Duncan Greenhill

After coffee and biscuits, we moved across to the other side of Fistral beach as the tide continued to fall to meet Frances and the other participants for the rockpooling session. This was more productive for me personally, catching a large Shanny (Lipophrys pholis, and thanks to Fiona for spotting it), and later a long-spined Sea Scorpion (Taurulus bubalis). The Sea Scorpion was a complete surprise as I ran my hands through the unlikeliest looking crevice in the rock behind where we’d left our bags and found quite a sizeable fish at about 15cm long.

Shanny (Lipophyrys pholis)
Shanny (Lipophyrys pholis). CC BY-SA Duncan Greenhill
Long Spined Sea Scorpion
Long-spined Sea Scorpion (Taurulus bubalis). CC BY-SA Duncan Greenhill

As the tide started to come in we used a seine net to sample over the sand in the surf. It was hard work, and involved coordination so that the top and bottom ropes were hauled in at similar rates, and that the bottom rope was kept low to avoid all the specimens escaping underneath. We found a prawns and shrimps, a juvenile flatfish, and a number of Lesser Weaverfish (Echiichtyhys vipera), which questioned the wisdom of so many swimmers going into the water barefoot. The day ended with pasties on the beach.

Overall, it was a great weekend. I learned a lot, in good company, and hope to return next year to do the seasearch observer course.

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Lundy – An island of firsts

As this is the first post, I thought I’d look at another first of the marine enviroment, at least here in the UK: Lundy island. It was the first Marine Nature Reserve (MNR), the site of the first no-take zone, and the first Marine Conservation Zone (MCZ).

The island sits in the Bristol Channel about 19 kilometres off the Devon coast. It’s around five kilometres long and just over one kilometre wide, and runs roughly north-south. The importance of the island’s natural history, both above and below the water, has been recognised for a long time. The seas around the island became a voluntary marine nature reserve in 1971 and the entire island itself was listed as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in 1976.

Grey Seal. Photo credit: Andreas Trepte
Grey Seal. Photo credit: Andreas Trepte

The voluntary MNR was, as it name suggests, voluntary, but as time has progressed, the protection for Lundy has increased. A key point came in 1981 when the Wildlife and Countryside Act became law because it allowed marine nature reserves to be established with legal protection in much the same way that nature reserves on land could be protected. The marine nature reserve gained its statutory (legal) protection in 1986.

Lundy is also unusual in having a no-take zone off the eastern coast of the island where all forms of fishing are banned. This protects habitats and animals (such as the pink sea fan) from damage by fishing gear, and allows populations to build up and then spill out into surrounding areas. The NTZ was set up in 2003 and is legally enforceable under a fisheries bye-law, and a survey programme was undertaken to monitor the effects. By 2007, the number of lobsters above the minimum size that could be landed had increased by over 400%[1], despite the fact that the NTZ is relatively small at around 3.3 km2[2] compared to over 30 square kilometres covered by the MNR).

The area got another layer of protection in 2005 when the area covered by the MNR was designated as a Special Area of Conservation (SAC). SACs are designed to protect certain habitats and particular species, and in the case of Lundy the habitats selected for protection were most importantly the reefs, and to a lesser extent the submerged and partially submerged sea caves, and sandbanks that are partially covered by seawater[3]. Lundy is a breeding site for the grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), the largest sea in UK waters and globally rare, and some seals pup in sea caves in the intertidal zone.

Finally, in January 2010, the seas surrounding Lundy (and other existing MNRs such as Skomer) became Marine Conservation Zones (MCZs), and are meant to be the first of a network of MCZs in the UK, although controversially, only 27 of 127 potential sites received approval in the first round of designations[4].

Lundy is an island geologically as well as literally. It’s not only an island of land but also an island of hard surfaces in a sea of surrounding soft sediments. It’s mostly composed of granite, with some slate at the southern end and below the water the reefs extend offshore (for a kilometre on the western side) before dropping to relatively deep water (30 to 40 metres) and softer sediments. The tidal currents in and out of the Bristol Channel are strong and the tidal range can be up to nine metres. The tidal regime and the complex rocky environment gives rise to a mosaic of different habitats. The underwater cliffs and overhangs are home to a variety of marine invertebrates, including all five British species of cup corals[5]. Filter feeders like anemones, corals, bryzoans and sea squirts thrive here. The seas off Lundy island are outstanding in conservation terms and the island fully deserves its list of firsts.

Footnotes

1http://www.lundymcz.org.uk/docs/public/CMER_Lundy%20NTZ_First%205%20Years.pdf
2http://www.lundymcz.org.uk/conserve/ntz
3,5http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/ProtectedSites/SACselection/sac.asp?EUCode=UK0013114
4http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25032255

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